1
1. Drag the conductivity meter and place the positive (+) and negative (-) ends in the water. Click on “show values” in the concentration section.
2. Use the “solute” section to add salt to the water. Observe what happens to the conductivity meter

3. Change evaporation to “lots” until you have reduced the water to approximately 0.50 L solution. Observe what happens to the conductivity meter.

Conductivity Model Pure Water
Questions

What happens to the conductivity meter?

Does this solution conduct electricity?

Does changing the amount of water affect conductivity?


Conductivity Model Salt Water (not evaporated)
Questions

What happens to the conductivity meter as salt is added?

Does this solution conduct electricity?

Does changing the amount of salt affect conductivity?


Conductivity Model Salt Water (evaporated)
Questions

What happens to the conductivity meter as water is evaporated?

Does this solution conduct electricity better or worse?

Does changing the amount of water affect conductivity?


4. Click “Reset All”, drag the conductivity meter into the solution again. Select “Sugar” as your solute and add the container of sugar to the solution. Draw a model in the next section to illustrate your observations.
5. Change evaporation to “lots” until you have reduced the water to approximately 0.50 L solution. Observe what happens to the conductivity meter. Draw a model in the next section to illustrate your observations.

Conductivity Model Sugar Water (not evaporated)
Questions

What happens to the conductivity meter as sugar is added?

Does this solution conduct electricity?

Does changing the amount of sugar affect conductivity?


Conductivity Model Sugar Water (evaporated)
Questions

What happens to the conductivity meter as water is evaporated?

Does this solution conduct electricity?

Does changing the amount of water affect conductivity?

Part 2: “Micro” Tab (5 points)

6. Click on the “Micro” tab. Add sodium chloride (NaCl) to the water. Switch the solute to sucrose (C12H22O11) and add this to the same solution. Draw a model illustrating the difference and similarities of these two solutes below.

Sodium Chloride and Sucrose Dissolving
Questions

How are the two solutes similar? Different? (You can draw or write an answer in this box)
What happens when sodium chloride is added to water?

What happens when sucrose is added to water?

Why do you think the molecules move in a random motion (instead of straight lines)


8. Click on the “Periodic Table” button for each solute.
What kind of atoms make up NaCl? ____________________
What kind of atoms make up C12H22O11?________________
Part 3: “Water” Tab (5 points)

1. Click on the “Water” tab and click “water partial charges”.
What is the partial charge on Oxygen (larger red one)?________
What is the partial charge on Hydrogen (smaller white one)?_________

2. Add salt to the water, wait a few seconds, click pause, and draw what happens in the space below and record 3 observations.
3. Click the “reset” button. Add sugar to the water, wait a few seconds, click pause, and draw what happens in the space below and record 3 observations.

Sodium Chloride in Water (with charges)
3 Observations

1.
2.
3.


Sucrose in Water (with charges)
3 Observations

1.
2.
3.


4. POST LAB (7 points): Make a Claim, supported by evidence and reasoning to answer the following question:

Question: How can electrical conductivity be used to determine bond type? (In your CER make sure to also explain why different bonds behave differently)
Claim:
Evidence 1:


Evidence 2:


Evidence 3:


Reasoning 1:


Reasoning 2:


Reasoning 3:

0 Answer